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irt wildfire ( 14 results )

This is a link to the Texas Forest Service’s burn ban assignment for Texas. This is updated throughout the month to keep current on the burn ban status of Texas.

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Source:  Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

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Analyzing injuries to cattle following a wildfire is important to minimize losses, said a Texas AgriLife Extension specialist.

“It might look like they’ve made it and there was no visible physical damage,” said Dr. Floron “Buddy” Faries, Extension program leader for veterinary medicine. “However, it’s important to have them looked at by a veterinarian as soon as possible because there could be secondary problems that lead to infections and further problems.”

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Texas has experienced three significant dry periods in a decade, affecting the availability and cost of roughage for feeding horses. Texas is home for an estimated one million head of horses, and owners are interested in stretching hay supplies and use of a alternative roughage sources.

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Horses affected by fires are stressed and their feed needs to be managed appropriately.

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Research shows that how the house is built, the characteristics of the adjacent vegetation and routine maintenance often determine which homes burn and which survive. The purpose of Living With Fire is to provide homeowners with wildfire threat reduction recommendations developed by Nevada’s firefighting experts. This program also provides suggestions about what to do during and after a fire.

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Treating and managing horses that have been affected by fires.

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Source:  TCEQ – Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

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From 1994 to 2004 federal agencies spent a total of $9,127,325,600 on aid after wildfires. In 2004 alone, a total of 6,790,692 acres were burned in wildfires in the United States, and Federal agencies spent $890,223,000 on recovery assistance. Wildfires also affect America’s farms and ranches, damaging and destroying homes, barns, agriculture production facilities, crops and livestock. Much of this damage can be avoided, or at least minimized, if a few precautions are taken to minimize the risk and spread of wildfires.

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From 1994 to 2004 federal agencies spent a total of $9,127,325,600 on aid after wildfires. In 2004 alone, a total of 6,790,692 acres were burned in wildfires in the United States, and Federal agencies spent $890,223,000 on recovery assistance. Wildfires also affect America’s farms and ranches, damaging and destroying homes, barns, agriculture production facilities, crops and livestock. Much of this damage can be avoided, or at least minimized, if a few precautions are taken to minimize the risk and spread of wildfires.

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