Floods ( 39 results )

Source:  FEMA

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Source:  North Dakota State University Extension Service

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Source:  Weather Underground

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Water from a well that has been flooded should be assumed to be contaminated. Do not use the well water for drinking, cooking, making ice, brushing teeth, or even bathing until you are satisfied that the water is not contaminated. In order to ensure that the water is safe, the well should be disinfected, then the water should be tested to make sure pathogens have been completely eliminated.  The focus of this publication is decontaminating and disinfecting a flooded water well.

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After the flood waters recede and the clean up has been done, most folks want to get back into their homes and start rebuilding. The problem is that wood that has been submerged in water has likely absorbed a large amount of water. Rebuilding too quickly after a flood can cause continuing problems such as mold growth, insect infestations, and deterioration of the wood and wall coverings.

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Source:  Texas Division of Emergency Management

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Source:  eExtension and National EDEN

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Source:  North Dakota State University Extension

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Tremendous amounts of rain can fall over a short period of time resulting in flooding of low-lying areas. With this flooding comes the problem of various “critters” trying to find safe, dry ground. In areas of Texas infested with the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren, these ants and their colonies can present a potentially serious medical threat to people and animals during times of flooding.

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Source:  Talking About Disaster: Guide for Standard Messages
 American Red Cross

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